Death and Dying

Assignment Requirements

 

I will upload

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 3125

12May14 Edition

TERM PAPER GUIDELINES

 

A. Possible Topics For Project Papers

I am most interested in how much “useable knowledge” you gain from exploring your topic. Therefore, it is important that you choose a topic that relates in some way to your life goals/experiences/quandaries, or curiosities. Of course, it also must be related to abnormal psychology, and it must be a topic that has been researched from a scientific perspective. Use Google or scan though the Index of your text for other topics.   (Your topic should also not be something you know so much about that there is little room for more learning.

If exploring a topic is not your style, you may be more interested in an in-depth biography of an historic or contemporary psychologist. If there are problems/issues with this approach, let’s talk right away, before there are problems. Here are some topic possibilities (examples only):

 

 

Individual Disorders

Addiction/Alcoholism

ADHD

Agoraphobia

Alzheimer’s

Anorexia

Antisocial Personality

Anxiety Disorders

Aphasia/Dyslexia

Attachment

Asperger’s/Autism

Behavioral Addictions

Bipolar Disorder

Death & Dying/Losses/Transitions

Depression

Down Syndrome

Effects of Trauma

Epilepsy/Seizures

Factitious Disorder/Malingering

Gender Identity/Issues

Happiness/Joy

Learning Disabilities

Mental Retardation

Obsessive/ Compulsive Behavior

Personality Disorders

Pervasive Developmental Disorders

Resilience

Schizophrenia

Suicide

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Sexual Disorders

Sleep Disorders/Narcolepsy

Stress

Substance Abuse

Temperament

Tourette’s Disorder

 

Community/Family Issues

Child Abuse/Neglect

Cultural Difference/Effects/Ethnicity

Domestic Violence/Marriage Issues

Public Health

Primary Prevention

 

Therapies

AA/Support Groups

Art/Music Therapy

Behavior Modification/Therapy

Biofeedback

Cognitive Therapy

Desensitization

Deinstitutionalization

Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT)

EMDR

Existential Therapy

Exorcism

Family/Marital Therapy

Group Therapy

Hypnosis

Medications/Psychoactive Drugs

Pet Therapy

Play Therapy

Psychotherapy

 

Professional/Legal Issues

Confidentiality/Privacy

Duty To Warn

Hx of treatment, concepts, professions, etc

Informed Consent

Involuntary Commitment

Professional Liability

Research Ethics

Stress in the work place

Team Approaches/Professional Roles

Volunteers

 

 

B. Data Gathering for Your Project Paper

 

  1. Type “1” Resources – “The Lay Public”

A. Sources –Include at least four, one for each of the following:

  1. Parents/persons in a previous generation
  2. Friends/peers
  3. Yourself (before you started your research)
  4. A non-Lutheran practicing Registered Nurse (with or without an advanced degree)
  5. For each person, determine information such as:
  6. How they see the topic-area
  7. If a “problem” is involved in your topic, what do they see as being the causes, solutions, future trends, of the problem?
  8. Where did they get their information on the topic?
  9. If your topic area is a “problem/diagnosis,” you get extra points for including an interview with someone who actually has/had that problem

 

  1. Type “2” Resources – “The Lay Press” . Written for the “Educated” public.
    If you’re not sure, look the book up on Amazon.Com and read what the publishers say about.

Include at least two. Examples:

—     Psychology Today; Harvard Mental Health Letter, etc

—     Newspapers

—     Wikipedia.Com; PsyWeb.Com; WebMD.Com, HealthLine.Com, etc.

—     Magazines

—     Blogs/Internet sites dedicated to the topic

—     Dictionaries/Encyclopedia

—     Book series such as: Idiots Guide to ….. or ….. For Dummies

 

  1. Type “3” Resources –“Experts:” Professionals writing for professionals (and students).
  2. Experts/Scientists/Professionals (consult at least 1).
  3. A professional expert is someone with at least a masters and frequently a doctorate degree. Since this is a psychology course, the requirement is for someone who has studied the topic from a psychological perspective.

Despite his insights and experiences, therefore, a policeman would not be considered an expert on the criminal mind, nor would an alcoholic be an expert on alcoholism, though both would be useful inclusions under Type I.C, above. If there is any doubt about someone you are considering, please consult me before your decision.

  1. There are two goals: First, to get an expert/professional’s point of view. Second to begin to see yourself as an “up and coming” colleague who is becoming a scientist, expert, professional. This last goal implies that:
  2. Face-to-face interviews are strongly preferred and earn more points.
  3. Do not use friends, relatives, family doctor, your therapist, someone you already know (but a former instructor is OK).
  4. Email interviews are never acceptable.
  5. Obtain information as outlined in 1B, above.

4      Look in the phone book for local agencies that work with your issue; call the local United Way, or Mental Health Association for leads. Check the education, psychology, nursing, etc., departments of local universities and colleges for suggestions.

 

  1. Books

Include at least two, in addition to the text and DSM-IV TR

  1. Include material available in the course text. If none, still refer to the text your References Section and say so in you paper.
  2. If your topic relates to psychopathology, include a review of DSM-IV TR material.

Even if it does not relate to DSM, include DSM in your References section and mention that fact explicitly in the text of your paper.

  1. Technicalscholarly books are not required, but must be written by credentialed experts.
  2. Check with a librarian or college bookstore for required textbookssupplemental readings.
  3. If a book is written for “parents,” “families,” or those “with a problem,” it is more likely a Type II than a Type III.
  4. No Internet sources for this type.
  1. Scientific, Peer-reviewed Journals (include at least 3)
  2. Peer-reviewedRefereed journals published for professionalsscholars.
  3. Article must be an original report of research or a review of research, not just theory.
  4. Usually available only in libraries. Check with a librarian, PsychInfo, Eric (Educational), EBSCO host database, the References Section of the course text, or the books by experts in III.B, above.
  5. No Internet-only sources for this type. You may use the internet to locate and download an article, but articles published only on the internet are not acceptable.

IV. Type “4” Recommended Resources –Best resources you found on your topic.

Included at least 3; Types II & III only

  1. Local Agency: Where does one go to solve the problem? (If you are unsure, you might check the phone book; call United Way or the Mental Health Association; or ask your professional expert for a referral during your interview.)
  2. What programs, services, curricula, resources are available?
  3. Is there a fee?

B. Best internet site(s) that specialize in the topic/problem.

  1. Best single article/book/resource
  2. Available support/advocacy groups (gets extra points)

 

Note: Aside from Type IV’s you should have at least thirteen (13) different references in your Reference List:

Type I’s –4

Type II’s –2

Type III’s –7:

1 –Expert,

1 –The Text,

1 –DSM-IV-TR,

2 –Books for Professionals,

2 –Peer Reviewed Journal articles

 

C. Dates To Remember

 

  • It is essential that each of these assignments be turned in on time. If you can’t be in class on the day assigned, have a classmate bring the assignment in for you.
  • Never turn in the only copy you have of an assignment; make backups of everything.

 

  1. ____________________________ (Check the course syllabus and write in)

Turn in two (2) pages:

1.   A cover page (see below) with the title of your paper. While I can extend a lot of latitude in what you choose to work on, remember this is a Psychology course, so it must be relevant to psychology, and it will have to be a topic with research that has been reported scholarly, refereed, journals. If your topic meets these criteria, I will return it to you with my signed, “OK,” if not I will ask you to make an appointment with me, before or after class to work out an agreement.

2.   A second page with a brief description of your topic. One paragraph is usually enough.This is a description of your topic, not a summary of your paper, so it should only be a few sentences long, and you probably won’t need to spend more than 20 minutes writing it. The goal here is to know enough about your topic to be sure that it is workable for our purposes, before you put your time into something that does not fit, such as something that has not been published in professional journals, or something that is so general, vague, etc., that it could not possibly be covered in one paper.

 

  1. ____________________________ (Check the course syllabus and write in)

Turn three (3) pages (at least):

1.   Cover page, as above.

2.   Brief description page, as above.

  1. A list of your resources in the form of a References Section.

The goal is to make sure that we are together on the resource requirements while there is still time to correct misunderstandings.

 

  1. ____________________________ (Check the course syllabus and write in)

Turn your completed paper in by this date (or any date before) if you would like to receive feedback, including the opportunity to revise and improve your grade. Do not turn in a “rough draft,” and I can not be your proofreader, so please only turn in papers that you feel you have done everything you can do to make them as good as you can make them.

Do not, for example, turn in incomplete papers or papers that you and your proofreader have not carefully and thoroughly checked and corrected. Make sure that your proofreader signs your paper in the proper spot and make sure that you include your expected grade. Turn in your best work, and I’ll try to find ways to help you make it better.

If you choose to later turn in a revised version, turn in both versions on the final due date so I can be clear in regard to where we are at in the process and what you’re working on.

 

  1. ____________________________ (Check the course syllabus and write in)
    This is the final date to turn in your paper if you would like it returned with your grade and my comments and feedback (you will not be able to revise). You can pick up your paper from the day of the final Quiz.   This is the only way I can return your graded paper to you.

 

  1. ____________________________ (Check the course syllabus and write in)

This is the final time and date to turn in your paper, including revisions. Turn in your paper from the day of the final/7th quiz. No emailed papers accepted. No extensions, no exceptions, no how. Papers turned in on this date will not be returned, even with self-addressed stamped envelopes.

 

D. Mechanics

 

  1. Style

 

A. The basics

—     Papers must be typed, in black ink, on 8 ½ by 11 typing paper, one side only

—         Use “Times New Roman,” and a font size of 12.

—         Use one (1) inch margins all around; larger margins make your text look “spread out;” smaller margins make your text look cramped and are hard to read.

—         Double space: except

– Since you are double spacing, do not include an “extra” blank line between paragraphs.

– Do not double space the References Section.

– Each page of text should include 24 lines/page

—         Based on these guidelines, each page of text should include at least 300 words.

—     Turn in stapled; do not fold over the corners or use paperclips, rubber bands, or gum. Do not use any type of cover or folder. No emails or handwritten papers will be accepted.

—     HINT –Look at your paper after it is typed: a well laid out paper actually “looks good”.

 

  1. Tone

—     Your goal is to develop the skill to communicate in writing across locals, cultures, and times. Your writing style, therefore, should be scholarly, academic, objective and professional, like a formal lecture; not informal, subjective, conversational, or colloquial. Use “proper” English, and learn to imitate the writing style of your text and your Type III resources. Do not write as if you are talking to a friends, but as if you are presenting to a group of strangers that you want to be especially sure understand you.

—     Do not use contractions (“do not” vs. “don’t), slang, or refer to people by their first name.

—     A common problem when you are learning to write well is the tendency to use HUGE paragraphs. Limit yourself to one thought per paragraph, and press the [Enter] key often. You should probably average 2-3 paragraphs per page, minimum.

—         Use commas everywhere appropriate to clarify your meaning and to make reading easier.

 

C. Format

A. In general, follow APA style as much as possible. Several good summaries of APA style are available on line, and I have uploaded one for use in this class to Blackboard: under the “Term Paper” heading look for “APA Style –Lite.Pdf. Here are some others:

http://www.docstyles.com/archive/apacrib.pdf

http://www.uwsp.edu/PSYCH/apa4bs.htm

http://www3.wooster.edu/psychology/apacrib/apacrib.html

B. Pay close attention to APA style for:

  1. Title Page (see below)
  2. References
  3. Use a running head with page number on each page, after the title page.
  4. List your resources beginning on a separate, “References” page.
  5. Entries are grouped by resource type, I, II, III, IV.

Within each group resources are alphabeticalized, using the last name of the senior author (material without a stated author are alphabeticalized using the first word of the title).

        Do not double space the References section.

        Out dent each item

  1. In addition, the last page of your “References” should contain, your evaluationgrade for your paper, as you see it, the date you submitted the paper, and the signature of your proofreader, all in the bottom right hand corner of the page:

Grade I believe I have earned: ________________

Date Submitted: ___________________________

Proof Read by (signature): ___________________

 

  1. Your ideas should be presented in an integrated format. Do not, for example, go through each of your resources one at a time and tell me what each said. You have become something of an expert on your topic, and I want you to use your expertise to educate me about your topic.

 

  1. When presenting your ideas, opinions, conclusions, etc, be sure to indicate that they are yours. Say, for example, “I believe …,” “It seems to me …,” “In my opinion …,” “I disagree with …”

 

  1. Quotations

Make sure you use quotation marks around any material that you are quoting from interviewees, articles, or other sources. Refer to interviewees by their first and last name (real or fictitious names can be used) and books or articles by the author’s last name, publication date, and page number. For example, “Jones (2004, p 203).” When in doubt, check the APA format. In addition, be careful to cite the source when you are paraphrasing or presenting someone else’s ideas in altered form.

Plagiarism includes copying, paraphrasing, or using the ideas of someone without giving them credit by way of a proper citation. Plagiarism is not acceptableand will result in failure for the assignment. If in doubt or in borderline cases, please “over-cite” to be safe. For questions about plagiarism, speak to me.

 

  1. Proof reading.

The foundation of effective communications is feedback. In order to make sure that your paper conveys exactly what you intend, make sure you have someone else proofread it (a friend, parent, classmate, spouse), in addition to yourself. Although I try not to let such things influence my evaluations, creative spelling and grammar interferes with communicating your ideas. When professionals write, they always use proofreaders, or even editors; so this may be one of the most important things you learn in this course.

In terms of your own proof reading, make sure you print out and review a “hard-copy” of your paper, after you proofread it on the computer. Make the needed corrections, then print out a revised copy for your proofreader to check. Do not give your proofreader a “draft.”

While it is an “honor” to let a parent or partner read your paper and give you feedback, be sure that your “official” proof reader is a good writer themselves. Look for someone who did well in English, someone who is a “stickler” for details, someone who reads a lot, someone who can write on a college level. If the main feedback your proof reader gives you is that your paper is “wonderful,” you probably need an additional proof reader.

If you can not find a “qualified” proofreader, do get feedback from your family and friends, but for your official proofreader, contact Webster’s Academic Resource Center; they will be able to help you.

  1. If you plan to major in psychology or go to graduate school, you will need to begin learning APA formatstyle as soon as possible. While I will not strictly enforce these standards, you will get extra points for following these standards and the effort you make learning the standards will be a big help to you in the future.

 

  1. Putting together a college level Term Paper is a complex, demanding task. For those that have not had a lot of experience at this level, or for those who would just like to improve their skills, Webster has a terrific Academic Resource Center that really can help. It’s free of charge and can be a real investment in your college skills and yourself. Call them at 314.246.7620. They are in Loretto Hall, Rm 6.
  1. Grade

 

  1. This paper represents a substantial portion of your final grade and it should reflect an appropriate amount of thought and effort. I do not grade on length, but, in the past, I have found “A” papers are generally between 12 and 16 pages of text, not counting cover sheets and References, etc. As a reference point, 12 pages with 300 words each is 3,600 words, your minimum.

I have uploaded onto Blackboard examples of what I considered to be “A” papers. Look in the “Example Papers” directory.

 

  1. Although I have requirements about what resources you should base your paper on, I am most interested in how you use what you have learned from your resources. This is not a summary of “facts,” but an examination of what difference it makes to you that you have the facts you learned.

Thus, it is essential that you include a section in your paper, probably the largest section, devoted to how you will use what you have learned in regard to yourself, your family, and friends, psychology, the world, etc. For example (this is not a check list, just examples):

  1. From your personal perspective, what thoughts did your resources stimulate: what are your reactions, criticisms, etc? Note, this must be more that a statement of your personal preference, taste, or a statement that you agree, disagree, can’t believe, or hold a different view. I am interested in why you agree or disagree, why you believe or disbelieve, etc.
  2. How can you use, apply, or begin to implement the knowledge you gained in your daily life, theoretically, etc.? What effects has it had on your personality, view of the world, psychology, yourself, others; what difference has it made? What difference would it have made in your life if you would have known earlier what you learned. Please be specific; to only say that you can use the “insights/knowledge in the future” does not tell me much.
  3. If your paper is really more theoretical than personal, how did what you learned make a difference in your theoretical understanding? How did it change your views about psychology, yourself, others, etc.? Include insights into, speculations about, enlargements upon, or changes in your theoretical views.

What effects did your research have on your views regarding Psychology’s on-going debates concerning nature-nurture, mind-body, and how ideas are formed? Before, then after your research, were you more impressed with the importance of biopsychosocial, psychological, or social-cultural influences?

  1. What did you learn about the differences in Type 1, 2, and 3 resources? How will you use what you have learned about these differences?

 

  1. At the end of your paper, indicate what grade you feel you should receive for your paper and why.

 

  1. Breakdown of grade earned
  2. Class presentation: 10%
  3. Mechanics (formatfollowing directionsgetting details rightappearancesspelling): 15%
  4. Writing styleToneGrammar: 15%.
  5. Resources gathered as presented: 30%
  6. What you learned from this experience (see III. Grade.B.1-4, directly above): 30%
  7. In order to receive full credit for the last two items, you must follow the guidelines outlined in the Syllabus and synthesize in-depth information from relevant sources representing various points of view/approaches. Double check the Syllabus for information on partial credit.

 

E. Class Room Presentations For Term Papers

 

  1. Check your Syllabus to determine the date for class room presentations.

 

  1. Your presentation should be between three (3) to five (5) minutes.

Feel free to use notes, PowerPoint’s, visual aides, etc, whatever will make your presentation more useful to your class mates. Avoid simply reading your paper. Practice your presentation out loud before hand.

 

  1. Prepare a revised References list and make enough copies for each member of the class to have one. Your revised list can omit type I resources and must have your Term Paper title and your name at the top.

 

  1. Feel free to omit any and all personal information that you might be uncomfortable sharing from your presentation

 

  1. Your presentation will highlight the main points of your paper. Examples:
  2. What did you learn about the differences in Type I, II, and III resources? How will you use what you have learned about these differences?
  3. From your personal perspective, what thoughts did your resources stimulate: what are your reactions, criticisms, etc? Note, this must be more that a statement of your personal preference, taste, or a statement that you agree, disagree, can’t believe, or hold a different view. I am interested in why you agree or disagree, why you believe or disbelieve, etc.
  4. How did your Term Paper change your views about psychology, yourself, others, etc.? Include insights into, speculations about, enlargements upon, or changes in your views. What effects did your research have on your views regarding Psychology’s on-going nature-nurture debate? Before, then after your research, were you more impressed with the importance of biopsychosocial, psychological, or social-cultural influences?
  5. How can you use, apply, or begin to implement the knowledge you gained in your day-to-day life, theoretically, personally, etc.? What effects has it had on your personality, view of the world; what difference has it made?

 

  1. If you are the first person in your group to present, begin your presentation with:

“Hello; this is the _______ group. My name is _____________ and I’m going to tell you about my Term Paper on __________________.”

Subsequent presenters in the group, can just introduce themselves and their topic.

After completing your presentation it is appropriate to say something such as, “Thank you (for your attention); are there any questions or comments?”

 

  1. Integrated, group presentations earn bonus points.

 

Running Head: NATURAL DIFFERENCES                                                                                  1


<Example Title Page>

NATURAL DIFFERENCES

 

I’m A. Student

Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Webster University

 

Author Note

Correspondence concerning this paper can be sent to I’m A. Student, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Webster University, Webster Groves, Missouri 63119. Address email to I’mAStudent88@Webster.Edu

Natural Differences                                                                                                                        2

 

 

<Note: These are example headings; not required. You may follow your own inclination>

 

INTRODUCTION

Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. etc

 

REVIEW OF RESOURCES

Type I Resources (bold)

Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text., etc

Type II Resources (bold)

Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text., etc

Type III Resources (bold)

Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text., etc

 

SORTING OUT THE DIFFERENCES

Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text., etc

 

HOW I CAN USE WHAT I HAVE LEARNED

Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text. Text, text text., etc

 

Natural Differences                                                                                                                       3

References

<Note: Not double spaced and do not leave a blank line between items>

 

Type I Resources

Hover, Herb (November 22, 2008). Personal Communication. Neighbor

Student, Ma. (November 24, 2008). Personal Communication. Mother

Student, Bro (November 23, 2008). Personal Communication. Brother

Timmons, T. (November 12, 2008). Personal Communication. Former teacher.

 

Type II Resources

Thomson, Lenore (1988). Personality Type: An owner’s manual. NY, New York: Shambhala Press.

Hirsh, Sandra & Kummerow, Jean. Life Types. San Francisco: Warner Books: 1989.

David Keirsey on Temperament. (Last modified September 20, 2008). Wikipedia

Jung Typology Test (n.d.). Retrieved 06/14/11 from http://www.Humanmetrics.com/

Heiss, Marina. (2011). Extroverted intuitive feeling perceiving. Retrieved 12/23/11 from www.typelogic.com

 

Type III Resources

A. Experts:

Burks, Jayne, PhD (September 23, 1998). Sociologist; temperament researcher. Personal Communication

B. Books:

American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.) Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing

Chess, Stella & Thomas, A. (1984). Origins and evolution of behavior disorders from infancy to early adult life. New York: Brunner/Mazel.

Keirsey, D. & Bates, M. (1984). Please understand me: Character and temperament types. Chicago: Prometheus Nemesis Book Company.

Myers, I. B. (1962). The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Manual. New York: Consulting Psychologists Press.

Thomas, A. & Chess, S. (1980). The Dynamics of psychological development. New York: Brunner/Mazel.

Sarason, I.G. & Sarason, B.R. (2005). The Problem of Maladaptive Behavior (Eleventh Ed.). Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson/Prentice Hall

C. Journals:

Bagby, R. M., Marshall, M. B., Georgiades, S. (2005), Dimensional personality traits and the prediction of DSM-IV personality disorder symptom counts in a nonclinical sample. Journal of Personality Disorders. 19(1), 53-67.

Cloninger, C. R., Svrakic, D. M., Przybeck, T. R. (1993). A psychobiological model of temperament and character. Archives of General Psychiatry. 50(12), 975-990.

 

Type IV Resources

Best Local Agency Name, City, State Zip Code, Telephone Number

Available Support Group Name, City, State Zip Code, Telephone Number

Best Internet Site Name, URL (address)

Best Article/Book To Read

 

Grade I believe I have earned: ________________

Date Submitted: ___________________________

Proof Read by (signature): ___________________

 

Order Now

http://zelessaywritings.com/order/