Make a SOAP Note )Not a narrative essay): Assessing the Genitalia

Make a SOAP Note Not a narrative essay: Assessing the Genitalia

Note:  Your Discussion post should be in the SOAP Note format, rather than the traditional narrative style Discussion posting format. Refer to the Comprehensive SOAP Template in the attachments below for guidance.

Case: Dysuria

A 55-year-old African-American male reports to your clinic complaining of frequent and painful urination for the past 2 months. The patient is sexually active and has been in a monogamous relationship for the past 3 years. He reports no penile discharge, fever, chills, abdominal pain, or back pain. His father is deceased and passed away of colon cancer. His father had a history of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). The patient considers himself as a healthy male. He works for a large American corporation, has a relatively healthy diet, and exercises 4 to 5 times per week.


To prepare:

With regard to the case study you were assigned:

  • Review this week’s Learning Resources, and consider the insights they provide about the case study.
  • Consider what history would be necessary to collect from the patient in the case study you were assigned.
  • Consider what physical exams and diagnostic tests would be appropriate to gather more information about the patient’s condition. How would the results be used to make a diagnosis?
  • Identifyat least five possible conditions that may be considered in a differential diagnosis for the patient.


Address all these in the SOAP Note not an Narrative Essay (Follow the SOAP Note Template on the attachment):

  1. A description of the health history you would need to collect from the patient in the case study to which you were assigned.
  2. Explain what physical exams and diagnostic tests would be appropriate and how the results would be used to make a diagnosis.
  3. Listfive different possible conditions for the patient’s differential diagnosis, and justify why you selected each.


REMINDER:Please make a SOAP NOTE for this case. Make your own patient’s data, applicable health history, review of systems, P.E., labs, differential diagnosis, final diagnosis etc. Incorporate the data from the case in the SOAP note that you will do… This is not a narrative essay ok…. I need SOAP note (Nurse Practitioner/RN/MD  makes SOAP note)… Be guided with the SOAP Note in the template… Don’t copy paste. Formulate your own… Don’t forget to cite the Five Differential diagnosis and have Reference lists too. Rank the differential diagnosis from most to least likely… Expand more your ideas in explaining the laboratory/diagnostic tests, and final diagnosis at least 5 sentences with citations. Justify them correctly and briefly.



  • Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2015).Seidel’s guide to physical examination (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.

o    Chapter 16, “Breasts and Axillae” (pp. 350-369)

This chapter focuses on examining the breasts and axillae. The authors describe the examination procedures and the anatomy and physiology of breasts.

o    Chapter 18, “Female Genitalia” (pp. 416-465)

In this chapter, the authors explain how to conduct an examination of female genitalia. The chapter also describes the form and function of female genitalia.

o    Chapter 19, “Male Genitalia” (pp. 466-484)

The authors explain the biology of the penis, testicles, epididymides, scrotum, prostate gland, and seminal vesicles. Additionally, the chapter explains how to perform an exam of these areas.

o    Chapter 20, “Anus, Rectum, and Prostate” (pp. 485-500)

This chapter focuses on performing an exam of the anus, rectum, and prostate. The authors also explain the anatomy and physiology of the anus, rectum, and prostate.

  • Dains, J. E., Baumann, L. C., & Scheibel, P. (2016). Advanced health assessment and clinical diagnosis in primary care (5th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.

o    Chapter 5, “Amenorrhea” (pp. 47-60)

Amenorrhea, or the absence of menstruation, is the focus of this chapter. The authors include key questions to ask patients when taking histories and explain what to look for in the physical exam.

o    Chapter 6, “Breast Lumps and Nipple Discharge” (pp. 61-72)

This chapter focuses on the important topic of breast lumps and nipple discharge. Because breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women, it is important to get an accurate diagnosis. Information in the chapter includes key questions to ask and what to look for in the physical exam.

o    Chapter 7, “Breast Pain” (pp. 73-80)

Determining the cause of breast pain can be difficult. This chapter examines how to determine the likely cause of the pain through diagnostic tests, physical examination, and careful analysis of a patient’s health history.

o    Chapter 27, “Penile Discharge” (pp. 318-324)

The focus of this chapter is on how to diagnose the causes of penile discharge. The authors include specific questions to ask when gathering a patient’s history to narrow down the likely diagnosis. They also give advice on performing a focused physical exam.

o    Chapter 36, “Vaginal Bleeding” (pp. 419-433)

In this chapter, the causes of vaginal bleeding are explored. The authors focus on symptoms outside the regular menstrual cycle. The authors discuss key questions to ask the patient, as well as specific physical examination procedures and laboratory studies that may be useful in reaching a diagnosis.

o    Chapter 37, “Vaginal Discharge and Itching” (pp. 434-445)

This chapter examines the process of identifying causes of vaginal discharge and itching. The authors include questions on the characteristics of the discharge, the possibility of the issues being the result of a sexually transmitted infection, and how often the discharge occurs. A chart highlights potential diagnoses based on patient history, physical findings, and diagnostic studies.

  • Sullivan, D. D. (2012).Guide to clinical documentation (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis.

o    Chapter 3, “Adult Preventative Care Visits” (“Gender Specific Screenings”; pp. 48–49)

Note: Download the Physical Examination Objective Data Checklist to use as you complete the Head-to-Toe Physical Assessment Video assignment.

  • Seidel, H. M., Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2011). Physical examination objective data checklist. In Mosby’s guide to physical examination (7th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.

    This Physical Examination Objective Data Checklist was published as a companion to Seidel’s guide to physical examination(8th ed.), by Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., & Flynn, J. A. Copyright Elsevier (2015). From

  • Rosa, M. (2010). “Inflammatory” changes in breast: How to provide a better care to our patients.Archives of Gynecology & Obstetrics,281(5), 901–905.

    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    This article summarizes common causes of inflammatory changes in the breast. The authors discuss the importance of the early differential diagnosis of inflammatory changes in breasts.

  • Steggall, M., & Cox, C. (2009). A step-by-step guide to performing a complete digital rectal examination.Gastrointestinal Nursing7(2), 28–32.

    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    The authors of this article describe the process of conducting a digital rectal examination. The article also highlights areas of knowledge that gastrointestinal nurses may enhance.

  • Westhoff, C. L., Jones, H. E., & Guiahi, M. (2011). Do new guidelines and technology make the routine pelvic examination obsolete?Journal of Women’s Health20(1), 5–10.

    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    This article describes the benefits of new technology and guidelines for pelvic exams. The authors also detail which guidelines and technology may become obsolete.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012).Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Retrieved from

    This section of the CDC website provides a range of information on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The website includes reports on STDs, related projects and initiatives, treatment information, and program tools.

  • University of Virginia. (n.d.).Introduction to radiology: An online interactive tutorial. Retrieved from

    This website provides an introduction to radiology and imaging. For this week, focus on genitourinary radiology, as well as the cross-sectional female pelvis and the cross-sectional male pelvis in abdominal radiology.


Online media for Seidel’s Guide to Physical Examination

It is highly recommended that you access and view the resources included with the course text, Seidel’s Guide to Physical Examination. Focus on the videos and animations in Chapters 16 and 18–20 that relate to special examinations, including breast, genital, prostate, and rectal. Refer to the Week 4 Learning Resources area for access instructions on

Optional Resources

  • LeBlond, R. F., Brown, D. D., & DeGowin, R. L. (2009).DeGowin’s diagnostic examination (9th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill Medical.

o    Chapter 8, “The Chest: Chest Wall, Pulmonary, and Cardiovascular Systems; The Breasts” (Section 2, “The Breasts,” pp. 434–444)

Section 2 of this chapter focuses on the anatomy and physiology of breasts. The section provides descriptions of breast examinations and common breast conditions.

o    Chapter 11, “The Female Genitalia and Reproductive System” (pp. 541–562)

In this chapter, the authors provide an overview of the female reproductive system. The authors also describe symptoms of disorders in the reproductive system.

o    Chapter 12, “The Male Genitalia and Reproductive System” (pp. 563–584)

The authors of this chapter detail the anatomy of the male reproductive system. Additionally, the authors describe how to conduct an exam of the male reproductive system.


o    Review of Chapter 9, “The Abdomen, Perineum, Anus, and Rectosigmoid” (pp. 445–527)